Competition History

  • Lake Superior Spirit Award
  • 10000 Lakes Chairmans
  • World Competition Imagery Award

Robot Quick Info

  • Name Sir Bedivere
  • Year 2017
  • Weight 120 lbs
  • Programming Language Java
  • Status Competing
  • Game Steamworks
  • Initial Size 26.75″ x 36.75″ x 60″
  • Extended Size 37″ x 26″ x 12′

Robot Features

  • Drive Train
    • Tank Drive
    • Four CIM West Coast Products DS Gearbox
    • High Gear: 16ft/s
    • Low Gear: 4.5ft/s/li>
    • 4″ AndyMark Performance Wheels treaded with Blue Nitrile
  • Ground Intake
    • Blue Banebot rollers powered by 1 Bag motor
    • Rubber band keeps pressure pushing down on gear
    • 33 Orange Banebot wheel roller system to bring gear into slider powered by 1 Bag motor.
  • Human Player Intake
    • Aluminum tray that delivers gear to slider
    • Actuated into two positions by pneumatic cylinders
  • Gear Slider
    • Linear actuating gear carriage to allow for placement of gear even when drive train is offset
    • Autonomous Visual Tracking system to automatically align gear to peg
    • Powered by 1 Bag motor geared at 30:1
    • Active deployment system using two doors powered by pneumatic cylinders
    • Gear Carriage rode on McMaster Car linear slides
  • Hanger
    • Hook velcro drum meets loop velcro rope for touch and go climb
    • Hanger mounted on a pivot for smooth climb and great center of gravity placement
    • Powered by 1 CIM motor through a 50:1 gearbox
    • 4 second climb

Challenges

  • When you have a gigantic arm it’s hard to figure out what motors to use. Understanding what motors to use for the “elbow” and “wrist” took a lot of trial and error. Additionally since it was such a tippy robot, we had to put the battery up front and controlling the claw was a bit of a struggle at competition since we only had two joysticks that were directly controlling the elbow and wrist. Making it smooth and communicating with the driver was difficult. The programming department also had some struggle working with the drive team to get the robot performing correctly in a way that was easy to control. First year of us doing any sort of articulation.
  • Since the claw was so large, it got in the way easily and spinning around often hit the side-wall of the field which would bend the claw and make it useless. Controlling the arm to put the trackball over the overpass was an exercise in focus and communication with the drive team and was never as confident as we hoped. During the championship match, the robot hit a sidewall during autonomous and the power cable came out, instantly killing the robot. We were the highest scoring robot on the field and we were literally powerless.